Amazon Kindle ebook: Messages And Movies The Legendary Movie Posters Of Art Sims

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Music and Messages BookaiGraphic design can be a peculiar art form, especially in terms of appreciation for the people behind it. Teams of artists can put hours of effort into the creation of project that, upon completion, has the potential to become highly memorable and iconic. And while in the past, artists who worked in similar fields had the benefit of being able to sign their names to their works — like the print work of Toulouse Lautrec — today’s graphic designers go largely unnoticed. The book, “Messages And Movies : The Legendary Movie Posters of Art Sims,” takes a look at one such unsung artist: Art Sims. His team of creative, along with his own considerable talents, have created some of the most memorable. Marketing material for motion pictures over the last three decades. In art, the road from conception to completion is never an easy task, and this book illustrates that with graphic design it is no different. “Marketing is a long process,” said Sims. “And it takes a whole team of illustrators, designers and finishers to get it done.” Sims, is a designer and owner of Los Angeles-based design studio 11:24 Design. While his studio’s focus is on promoting African-American art and culture, 11:24 Design also does design work for the motion picture industry, working with such major studios as 20th Century Fox and Lucasfilms. While Sims has much in his portfolio to be proud of, a notable contribution is his work with filmmaker Spike Lee. Sims has worked on every Spike Lee film since 1988’s “School Daze.” He states that his working relationship with Lee wasn’t anything as serendipitous as happening upon some Hollywood style big break, but was completely by design — no pun intended. “I knew if I wanted to grow my business in marketing, I needed to work with stars,” Sims said. “So I sought out the work and my name started to spread after working with them.” “Messages And Movies” puts its focus primarily on Sims’ work with Spike Lee, showcasing all of his most memorable pieces produced for some of Lee’s most iconic films. The book is supplemented with materials that help viewers better understand the process. Included in the exhibit is one of Sims’ most recognizable designs, his poster for the 1992 film “Malcolm X.” At first glance, the design is as simple as they come: a massive silver X over a black background. Sims reminisces that coming to that design solution was anything but. His team was stumped as to how to sell a film for the historic civil rights activist, mulling over if there was any one period of his life that was right for selling the film. Eventually, the film’s star, Denzel Washington, suggested that since the subject matter was so complicated, simplicity was the key.